School of Pharmacy

About:
Through collaborating with UCL School of pharmacy, ranking 7th on the world, Newgiza University utilizes existing UCL teaching and assessment resources, delivering the NGU program that produces distinctive NGU Pharmacists.

Mission:
The Bachelor of Pharmacy at NGU mission aims at graduating a scientifically literate, research-informed, patient-centered, and socially responsible professional who can serve the medical needs of individuals and communities both in Egypt and abroad.

Prof. Dr. Duncan Craig, Director UCL School of Pharmacy, talking about NGU collaboration with UCL

  • Organogram

  • Accreditation & academic collaboration

    Accreditation:
    Endorsed by Presidential Decree in April 2010, NGU initially focused on the launching of three main schools: Medicine, Pharmacy, and Dentistry.
    The university first opened its doors in 2016, and since then, its schools have been witnessing a continual growth including fields other than healthcare, until it became a truly multidisciplinary university. NGU’s ongoing collaborations with globally-ranked academic institutions further cemented its growing reputation as a professional institute of higher education.

    University College London (UCL):
    The academic collaboration between UCL and NGU was centered on NGU’s School of Health Sciences, enhancing NGU’s academic capabilities, as well as offering world-renowned undergraduate programs, providing both school and students with ample opportunities for development on an academic and personal levels.
    This collaboration ensured that the highest international standards in teaching and research are met at NGU, with highly qualified faculty members providing instruction and supervision, starting at first with three schools: School of Medicine in collaboration with UCL Medical School, School of Pharmacy in collaboration with UCL School of Pharmacy, and School of Dentistry in collaboration with UCL Eastman Dental Clinic.
    Being London’s ‘global university’, University College London (UCL) has a distinguished presence in Australia and Qatar, as well as partnerships around the world with a host of leading educational bodies, from Berkeley to Yale, and Peking University to the University of Sydney, UCL’s influence spans the globe, with such accreditations, it brought its worldwide expertise to NGU.
    Having Currently ranked 7th on the QS World University Rankings, and consistently placing in the Top 20 of various global university rankings, UCL is widely recognized for its research capabilities and contributions to scholarships and innovations. The university boasts 29 Nobel Prize winners and is the 2nd most cited university in Europe, as of 2016.
    Right at the heart of the Giza Plateau and within touching distance of the Great Pyramids, UCL’s professors, lecturers, and staff lead the brightest young minds forward towards successful careers in their chosen field. UCL focuses on personal development and intellectual growth through typically small class sizes maintaining a low staff to student ratio, in line with the tutorial-based teaching methods employed by UCL globally. Constant student engagement on both a scholarly and extra-curricular level ensured a heightened learning experience, spurring every student towards discovering their true potential and realizing NGU’s goal of achieving truly unbounded thinking.

  • Program Summary

    The Bachelor of Pharmacy BPharm is a five-academic-year program (10 semesters), including an Introductory Semester shared with other health education programs at NGU (Medicine and Dentistry).

  • Program Structure

    The program requires the completion of 198 credit units during five academic years, in addition to achieving direct contact hours in classrooms, small groups and practical classes, workplace-based learning in clinical placements, project work, self-paced learning delivered via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and self-directed learning.

    The assessment approach has been designed alongside the curriculum that embraces the following key principles:
    a) Formative assessment: Students take formative tests throughout the modules running all through the program.
    b) Summative assessments: May take the form of written examinations, coursework, portfolio or reports (e.g. Elective) at the end of each semester.
    c) Practical/Objective: Structured Clinical Examinations (P/OSCEs)

    MODULES:
    Year 1: Semester 1: Introductory module
    Semester 1: Introductory module (IM 1.1.1)
    Includes underpinning basic sciences, basic communication skills, English language skills, in addition to orientation for a career in healthcare.
    Year 1: Semester 2:
    PHAR101: The role of pharmacists in health care
    Introduces students to their future role as pharmacists and to the current and evolving pharmacy profession. A “Top 25” drug list is introduced.
    PHAR102: Body systems and therapeutics 1.
    Provides a solid foundation of the biological sciences that underpin the clinical therapeutic uses of a drug, also introducing and discussing cell biology and biochemistry, cell and organ system function, whole body physiology and pharmacology.
    Year 2: Semester 1
    PHAR 201: Chemistry of medicines
    Provides a solid foundation of the chemical sciences underpinning the use of a drug in its broadest sense, in addition to introducing and discussing organic, physical and analytical chemistry concepts in detail.
    PHAR 202: Making safe and effective medicines
    Formulation and manufacture of safe and effective medicines, both sterile and non-sterile, with particular emphasis on liquid and semi-solid systems.
    Year 2: Semester 2:
    PHAR 203: Clinical and professional considerations
    The knowledge, skills and attitudes required for pharmacy practice are further developed throughout the module.
    The “Top 25” drugs will be extended to a “Top 50”
    PHAR 204: Body Systems and Therapeutics 2
    Concentrates on the cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine systems, providing a solid underpinning knowledge of the structure and function of these body systems. Discussing the concept of clinical therapeutics, demonstrating how drug utilization is firmly grounded in the pharmaceutical and pharmacological sciences.
    Year 3: Semester 1
    PHAR 301: Body Systems and Therapeutics 3
    Focuses on the central nervous system; gastro-intestinal system, liver, skin and eye, and at the same time providing a solid underpinning knowledge of the structure and function of these body systems.
    PHAR 302: Medicines from the bench to the clinic
    Describes the processes involved in the discovery, development and testing of a new molecule, i.e. its journey from the laboratory bench to clinical use.
    Year 3: Semester 2
    PHAR 303: Body Systems and Therapeutics 4
    Focuses on the immune system, disease relating to inflammation, infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, and cancer, providing a solid foundation of the relevant biological principles.
    PHAR 304: Communicating science and practice
    Further prepares students for their future role as pharmacists for the current and evolving pharmacy profession.
    The “Top 50” drug list is extended in this module to a “Top 75”.
    Year 4: Semester 1
    PHAR 401: Future design and delivery of medicines
    Explores some of the more advanced technologies used in the discovery and formulation of new drug molecules and production of the formulated product.
    PHAR 402: Life skills and professional skills
    Sound knowledge of research methodology is vital for modern healthcare professionals, as is the ability to apply research and evaluative skills in practice. This module also develops students’ personal skills in areas such as written and oral communication.
    Year 4: Semester 2
    PHAR 403: Options (Electives)
    Each student selects two options; one from strand A which comprises broad areas, whereas strand B comprises specific topics.
    PHAR 404: Experiential placement
    An experiential placement is a mandatory requirement for graduation in Egypt, hence, this ensures that suitable high-quality experiences are available for all students.
    Year 5: Semester 1
    PHAR 501: Independent research project
    Includes the design, implementation and delivery of a research project. The projects may be laboratory-based or practice-based or data/literature/theory based. Each student has an individual project and is assessed individually.
    Year 5: Semester 2
    PHAR 502: Advancing practice through science
    New advances in science and practice while revisiting topics previously covered in the course.
    PHAR 503: Preparation for professional practice
    Describes current and future roles in pharmacy and prepares students for practice.
    The “Top 75” drugs list is extended to a “Top 100”.

  • Research

    Research Lab:
    SOP currently has two state-of-the-art research facilities, where multi-disciplinary research groups are able to conduct ground-breaking research.

    Research Areas:
    • Biopharmaceuticals
    • Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM)
    • Nanotechnology
    • Drug discovery and evaluation of new treatments

  • Publications

    Published manuscripts with NGU affiliation:
    1. Olivia A. Attala, Medhat A Al-Ghobashy, Marianne Nebsen, Rasha El-Kholy & Maissa Y. Salem, Assessment of pectin coated magnetite nanoparticles in low energy water desalination applications Environ. Sci. Pollution Res. 25 (2018), 18476–18483.
    2. Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Samah M. Kamal, Ghada M. El-Sayed, Ali K. Attia, Mohamed Nagy, Ahmed ElZeiny, Marwa T. Elrakaiby, Mohammed M. Nooh, Maggie Abbassi & Ramy K. Aziz, Determination of Voriconazole and Co-administered Drugs in Plasma of Pediatric Cancer Patients using UPLC-MS/MS: A Key Step Towards Personalized Therapeutics, J. Chromatogr. B. 1092 (2018), 489–498.
    3. Olivia A. Attala, Medhat A Al-Ghobashy, Ahmed Ayoub & Marianne Nebsen, Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for simultaneous extraction and determination of 6-mercaptopurine and its active metabolite thioguanine in human plasma, J. Chromatogr. A 1561 (2018), 28-38.
    4. Olivia A. Attala, Medhat A Al-Ghobashy, Ahmed Ayoub, Jack Tuszynskie, A. R. Gardouh & Marianne Nebsen, Computer aided design of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for solid-phase extraction and determination of Levetiracetam in human plasma, RSC Adv. 8 (2018), 14280.
    5. Ali K. Attia, Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Ghada M. Elsayed, Samah M. Kamal, Voltammeric monitoring of linezolid, meropenem and theophylline in plasma, Anal. Biochem. 545 (2018), 54-64.
    6. Hoda E. Mohamed, Abeer A. Mohamed, Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Faten Abdel Aziz Fathalla, Samah S. Abbas, Stability assessment of antibody-drug conjugate Trastuzumab emtansine in comparison to parent monoclonal antibody using orthogonal testing protocol, J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 150 (2018), 268–277.
    7. Sara M. Shatat, Basma M. Eltanany, Abeer A. Mohamed, Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Faten A. Fathalla & Samah S. Abbas, Coupling of On-column Trypsin Digestion – Peptide Mapping and Principal Component Analysis for Stability and Biosimilarity Assessment of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone, J. Chromatogr. B 1072 (2018), 105–115.
    8. Eman M. Moenes, Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Abeer A. Mohamed, and Maissa Y. Salem, Comparative Assessment of the Effect of Glyco-engineering on the Pattern and Kinetics of Aggregate Formation of Darbepoetin Alfa using a Stability-Indicating Orthogonal Testing Protocol, J. Chromatogr. B 1072 (2018) 405-414.
    9. Fawzia A. Ibrahim, Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Mohamed K. Abd El-Rahman and Ibrahim F. Abo-Elmagd, Optimization and in line potentiometric monitoring of enhanced photocatalytic degradation kinetics of Gemifloxacin using TiO2 nanoparticles/H2O2, Environ. Sci. Pollution Res. 24 (2017), 23880–23892.
    10. Heba S. Abed, Medhat A. Al-Ghobashy, Faten A. Fath-Allah and Maissa Y. Salem, Evaluation of the combined effects of pegylation and glycosylation on the stability of erythropoietin using a stability-indicating SE-HPLC, Biologicals 50 (2017), 129 – 136.
    11. Abd Elhameid MK, Ryad N, Al-Shorbagy MY, Mohammed MR, Ismail MM, El Meligie S (2018). “Design, Synthesis and Screening of 4, 6-Diaryl Pyridine and Pyrimidine Derivatives as Potential Cytotoxic Molecules.” Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo).
    12. AbdElhameid MK, Labib MB, Negmeldin AT, Al-Shorbagy MY, Mohammed MR. (2018). “Design, synthesis, and screening of ortho-amino thiophene carboxamide derivatives on hepatocellular carcinomaas VEGFR-2Inhibitors.” J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem 33(1): 1472-1493.
    13. Ali RM, Al-Shorbagy MY, Helmy MW, El-Abhar HS (2018). “Role of Wnt4/beta-catenin, Ang II/TGFbeta, ACE2, NF-kappaB, and IL-18 in attenuating renal ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury in rats treated with Vit D and pioglitazone.” Eur J Pharmacol 831: 68-76.
    14. Fouad, M. A., Tolba, E. H., El-Shal, M. A. and El Kerdawy, A. M. QSRR modeling for the chromatographic retention behavior of some β-lactam antibiotics using forward and firefly variable selection algorithms coupled with multiple linear regression. J. Chromatogr. A. 2018, doi: 10.1016/j.chroma.2018.03.042.

    Projects/grants:
    • Industry-funded research project (awarded April 2018):
    Title: Immunoaffinity Extraction and Quality Assessment of Polyvalent FMD Vaccine
    Project team: Three academic institutes: School of Pharmacy, Newgiza University (host institute), Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, and Zewail City in addition to an industrial partner Middle East Vaccines (ME-VAC) working in the field of production of veterinary vaccines
    • Revision of ASRT research proposal (submitted May 2018, under review):
    Title: JESOR: Determination of the Capability of the Cardioprotective Cyclocreatine Phosphate to Reduce the Progression of Myocardial Infarction to Heart Failure in the Standard ISO Rat Model.
    Project team: Prof. Salwa Ahmed Elgebaly, Founder and CEO, Nour Heart, Inc., Vienna, Virginia, USA. Three academic institutes: Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University (host institute), School of Pharmacy, Newgiza University, and Faculty of Sciences, Helwan University.

  • Tuition Fees

    School of Pharmacy tuition fee for the academic year (2018-2019): EGP 85,000 for Egyptian students.

    Click here for more information about admission and tuition fees.

  • Faculty Members' Profiles

    Manal Mohamed Maher

    School Dean

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    Ahmed Sherif Attia

    Ph.D.

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    Medhat Al-Ghobashy

    Ph.D.

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    Muhammad Al-Shorbagy

    Ph.D.

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    Lamia Mohamed El Wakeel

    Ph.D.

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    Mohammed Abdallah

    Ph.D.

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    Nevine Shawky Abdelmalak

    Ph.D.

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    Ahmed Mahmoud Elkerdawy

    Ph.D.

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    Noha M. H. Abdel-Rahman

    Ph.D.

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    Muhammad Abdullatif

    Ph.D.

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    Sara Nageeb El-Helaly

    Ph.D.

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